Thank-You Card Do’s and Don’ts

You’ve put unprecedented care into this event – but don’t pat yourself on the back until you’ve cleared the final hurdle.

  • Story by Photo Anna Kidman

You’ve put unprecedented care into this event – but don’t pat yourself on the back until you’ve cleared the final hurdle.  

Do send your cards in a timely manner. Wedding thank-you cards have a generally accepted grace period of around three months after “I do”. In the blissful blur of newlywedom, however, time can fly – remember that even if three months – or more – has been and gone, when it comes to thank-you cards, it’s very much a case of better late than never.

Don’t overthink the message. The more work a task requires, the less likely it is to get done. It’s best to send a simple, gracious message in a timely manner than a highly personalised version that arrives late – or worse, never at all.

Do check the spelling of the recipient’s name.

Don’t be tempted to go digital. A thank-you note carries a lot more impact when the recipient knows you’ve physically assembled and posted it. Hand-written notes, too, carry a much more personal effect than a typed version.

Do always send a thank-you note – even if you didn’t like the gift.

Don’t go it alone. Writing thank-you notes is a time-consuming process – moreso than you may originally bargain for. Ease the load by splitting the task with your new husband.

Do include details. Your guests put time and thought into choosing a gift for you, which should be acknowledged with a specific reference to that gift and how you’re using it going forward.  For instance, “Thank you for the serving platters. We’ll keep you posted about a dinner party to christen them with next month!”

Do think of ways to go above and beyond. For example, enclose a printed snap from the recipient, captured by your photographer on the big day. 


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